History

Alpha Epsilon Pi, the International Jewish Fraternity, was founded in 1913 to give Jewish men a collegiate social and cultural brotherhood. Today, AEPi has 10,000 undergraduates in over 180 chapters across the USA, United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Israel.

Our chapter started in the early 1940s with the goal of uniting Jewish men at MIT and giving them a place to call home. Throughout this period we were a colony of AEPi known as the Alpha Club. During WWII the chapter became inactive when most members entered the service, but after the war, in 1948, we started up again, meeting weekly in the student dorms.

In 1948 we applied to the IFC for membership, and in 1951, after our three year probationary period, we became the Mu Tau Chapter of AEPi. To truly be a ‘home’ to Jewish men on campus we needed a house, and to that end we bought our historic brownstone at 155 Bay State Road also in 1951. The brotherhood quickly grew and in 1964 we bought a second house, at 165 Bay State, to accommodate the growth.

Through the decades we have continued to thrive and have received numerous awards both from MIT and AEPi International. We have had many notable alumni including H. Robert Horvitz (’68) who won the Nobel Prize in medicine, and Dominic Antonelli (’89), an astronaut. Over 75 of our graduates are currently presidents or CEOs of their companies, and over 50 have been or are professors.

In recent years our chapter has continued to excel at everything it does. Our brothers routinely secure jobs and internships with companies like Apple, Novartis, TripAdvisor, JP Morgan, McKinsey,  Chevron, the US House of Representatives, Google, Morgan Stanley, Massachusetts General Hospital, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Blade, Quizlet, Genentech, Goldman Sachs, and BCG, and continue their education at graduate schools such as MIT, Stanford, Princeton and more. Our brothers compete on varsity sports teams, act in performance groups, and of course we are highly involved in student leadership, from Hillel to the Undergraduate Association.